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Resistance Soldering 1

From various sorces, Tue, 26 Aug 1997

Found this stuff, hope it helps someone, not edited Reg Barron

    >Subject: RSM
    > (Vance Bass) says:
    > I have heard that it is possible to build a resistance soldering rig
    > using, among other things, an automobile battery charger and carbon rods
    > from flashlight batteries.
    >
    > Has anyone ever done this?  Do you have or know of plans which detail
    > how to accomplish this?  (I have more money than time, but the amount which
    > is allocated to my hobby prevents me from spending $300 on a resistance
    > solderer.)
    > Thanks for any help!
    >--

    I have just completed building such a rig.
    My carbon rod came from the brushgear of a large electric motor,
    although I beleive that from a flash light baterry should work.
    The motor brush carbon is formulated to withstand arcing and may
    last longer.
    I mounted the rod in an old soldering iron handle (heat resistant
    plastic) using telescoping brass tubing to match the diameters
    of various components.
    The connection to the rod from the battery charger is about #8 flex cable,
    again connected to the nested brass tubing. (I crimped it all with an
    industrial strength crimping tool).
    I modified the battery charger by putting a normally on push button
    switch in the primary circuit (mains side of the transformer) to allow
    me to postion the rod, brass components etc. before applying
    the current. If you don't do this you will ruin small components with
    burns from the arcing.
    Does it work? yes, but my 6 amp battery charger is not strong
    enough for my needs, also keeping my foot on the push switch
    and releasing to turn on the current is not natural and akward.
    Modifications for the future:
    A larger battery charger of transformer/rectifier.(a friend uses a 15 amp
    lashup with no problem)
    A better and independant control for foot operation. Probably a dimmer
    switch mounted in a box with a plug, this should also work for my
    dremel motor tool and setting the temperature of my soldering irons.

    Ian Simpson wrote:
    etc-rification
    : I mounted the rod in an old soldering iron handle (heat resistant
    : plastic) using telescoping brass tubing to match the diameters
    : of various components.
    : The connection to the rod from the battery charger is about #8 flex cable,
    : again connected to the nested brass tubing. (I crimped it all with an
    : industrial strength crimping tool).
    : I modified the battery charger by putting a normally on push button
    : switch in the primary circuit (mains side of the transformer) to allow
    : me to postion the rod, brass components etc. before applying
    : the current. If you don't do this you will ruin small components with
    : burns from the arcing.
    : Does it work? yes, but my 6 amp battery charger is not strong
    : enough for my needs, also keeping my foot on the push switch
    : and releasing to turn on the current is not natural and akward.
    : Modifications for the future:
    : A larger battery charger of transformer/rectifier.(a friend uses a 15 amp
    : lashup with no problem)
    : A better and independant control for foot operation. Probably a dimmer
    : switch mounted in a box with a plug, this should also work for my
    : dremel motor tool and setting the temperature of my soldering irons.

    Watch out!!!!  A triac-type dimmer may either blow itself into the next
    county with such an inductive load, and Dremel does NOT endorse the idea.
    Most of their tools now use a permag motor with a bridge rectifier inside
    the case.  Use of half-wave rectified scr controls can destroy the tool,
    but a full wave control works fine.  I use a variac with a resistive foot
    control for my small power tools- Dremel, Unimat, Sherline, etc.  I also
    picked up a small adjustable xformer which was made by Ungar for my soldering
    pencil- type iron.
    Sears has a foot switch in their tool catalog which is heavy enough for
    larger tools like a drill press, table saw, etc.  In my shop, every thing
    is controlled by a foot control.  It makes life a lot easier.
    See if you can find a catalog by a company that supplies tools for
    jewelers- Vigor used to be such a company.  After you quit salivating all
    over the pages, you might find a resistance unit or just the tool for
    with your own transformer for a more rational price than PBL wants.
    Or not- I haven't priced one in decades.  I bought mine from a company called
    "Brookstone" which used to offer a great line of precision tools, but they
    went yuppie with exotic garden and kitchen tools and I haven't heard from
    them in many years.  Pity.
    Again, I'd suggest a Variac feeding a husky fixed xformer via a foot
    switch for the current source.  These beasts can be found in surplus
    places sometimes for a good price.  Five amp minimum, I'd say for the
    input into a step-down xformer.  Mine is not metered- I adjust for smoke
    as the expression goes so can't give you any idea of what I'm using.
    I'll look into it and try to post some numbers later.
    Fred D.
    Fredric W. Dabney writes:
    [...]
    >
    >See if you can find a catalog by a company that supplies tools for
    >jewelers- Vigor used to be such a company.  After you quit salivating all
    >over the pages, you might find a resistance unit or just the tool for use
    >with your own transformer for a more rational price than PBL wants. Or
    >not- I haven't priced one in decades.  I bought mine from a company called
    [...]
    The latest Vigor catalog has a soldering machine that includes several
    carbons and claims to be a 1320 watt unit (intermittent use), if you
    have $188 you want to spend on it...
                          ...when I sit down to write
    Don Holly             my intentions are always blameless however
    deplorable            the ultimate effect of the act may turn out to be.
                                               --Joseph Conrad
    dholly wrote:
    : In article Fredric W.Dabney writes:
    : The latest Vigor catalog has a soldering machine that includes several
    : carbons and claims to be a 1320 watt unit (intermittent use), if you
    : have $188 you want to spend on it...

    That is less than some models of the unit PBL sells.  If it is the same
    unit I bought from Brookstone many years ago, at max it'll vaporize a
    piece of .25" brazing rod.
    By the way, if you do decide to try building your own, and if you get the
    notion of using arc welding rod, watch out.  There are several versions of
    the carbon rod, many of which have a soft center (not being a welder,
    I don't have the foggiest notion of the purpose of this rod) and it isn't
    worth a hoot for a resistance soldering machine.  For one thing, you can't
    shape it to a point.  Someone gave me some years ago, and I still have it
    because I can't use it.
    I'd like to see some information on this matter since I could use some rod.
    I've also given thought to making a very small holder and using
    draftsman's pencil graphite sticks.  I suspect they are also in short
    supply now, CAD being as pervasive as it is.
    Fred D.
    In article dholly writes:
       .
       .
       .
    >The latest Vigor catalog has a soldering machine that includes several
    >carbons and claims to be a 1320 watt unit (intermittent use), if you
    >have $188 you want to spend on it...
    And MicroMark has a 250 watt unit for $330.  Address for Vigor please.
    --
    Bill Ganoe -- U. of Arizona, SIE Dept **  Engineering:
    bill@SIE.Arizona.EDU                  **     The ultimate art
    602.621.2528                          **     of the human mind.
       In article Vance Bass says:
       >I have heard that it is possible to build a resistance soldering rig
       >using, among other things, an automobile battery charger and carbon rods
       >from flashlight batteries.
       >
       > Has anyone ever done this?  Do you have or know of plans which detail
       >how to accomplish this?  (I have more money than time, but the amount which
       >is allocated to my hobby prevents me from spending $300 on a resistance
       >solderer.)
    I have built several of these over the years. You will spend $20.00
    tops on the thing.
    Rather than a battery charger, I would recomend a 6.3V filament
    transformer from most any electronics supply house or old TV. These
    used to be very common as they provided the juice to heat up all those
    old glass glowing things used in electronics before transistors.
    The transformer fits into a small box. Wire the Primary to a 110V plug
    with an on/off switch. If you use a female plug like on most
    computers, you can hook in any line-side controls (such as foot
    controls and dimmer switches) at your leisure. Wire the secondary to a
    large stereo plug. This allows you to try lots of different carbon rod
    combinations easily.
    For the rod, cut appart a C-Cell flashlight battery. Wash away the goo
    inside being careful not to get too much in your eyes or on the family
    dog.  You will be left with a carbon rid that can be sharpened to a
    point and connected to one of the secondary wires. The second wire
    works well with an alligator clip to attach as a ground.
    If you use a foot switch on the primary side, you can hold the work in
    place with the carbon electrode, hit the switch 'til the solder flows,
    and then let up on the switch, holding the work 'til the solder
    rehardens. I like these best for trackwork, prefering a torch for most
    brass engine jobs.
    Enjoy.
                             Skip Egdorf

    In article <3c7uucINNsp7@duncan.cs.utk.edu> Vance Bass writes:
    >    I have heard that it is possible to build a resistance soldering rig
    >using, among other things, an automobile battery charger and carbon rods from
    >flashlight batteries.
    >
    >    Has anyone ever done this?  Do you have or know of plans which detail
    >how to accomplish this?  (I have more money than time, but the amount which
    >is allocated to my hobby prevents me from spending $300 on a resistance
    >solderer.)
    >
    >    Thanks for any help!
    >--
    >=-=-=All the above are OFFICIAL POSITIONS and are ABSOLUTELY TRUE!=-=-=
    >Vance Bass                               Reply-to: vrbass@vnet.ibm.com
    >"It don't mean a thing if it ain't got that certain je ne sais quoi."
                               -- Peter Schickele

    Yup. Been there, done that. Followed plans in the Narrow Gauge and
    Short Line Gazette, a mag for model rr. buffs. You need about 6-8
    volts and a bunch of amps, say possibly 10 or more (memory not sure
    here), a lamp dimmer on the hi voltage side of the xformer for
    control, a ground lead and the lead to the carbon rod. Email me your
    snail-mail address and I'll copy the article for you.
    ___________________________________________________________________
    Greg_Lewis
    Photojournalism sequence, Department of Mass Communication and
    Journalism
    CSU Fresno, Fresno, CA 93740-0010
    In article
    Greg Lewis writes:
    >From: Greg Lewis
    >Subject: Re: Building a resistance solder machine
    >Date: Fri, 9 Dec 1994 01:18:50 GMT
    >In article <3c7uucINNsp7@duncan.cs.utk.edu> bass@cs.utk.edu (Vance Bass) writes:
    >  I have heard that it is possible to build a resistance soldering rig
    >>using, among other things, an automobile battery charger and carbon rods from
    >>flashlight batteries.
    Here are several articles on the topic:
      MR   11/78 p80  Resistance soldering ( RESISTANCE, SOLDER, SOLDERING, TECHNIQUE )
      NGSL  9/81 p70  Building your own carbon-rod resistance soldering unit ( RESISTANCE, SOLDER, TOOL )
      MR    4/92 p112 Introduction to resistance soldering ( RESISTANCE, SOLDER )
    jeff.scherb@turner.com
    : >In article <3c7uucINNsp7@duncan.cs.utk.edu> Vance Bass writes:
    : >  I have heard that it is possible to build a resistance soldering rig
    : >>using, among other things, an automobile battery charger and carbon rods from
    : >>flashlight batteries.
    The following is from the FAQ on CONSTRUCTION TECHNIQUES:
    Date: 20 Mar 94 01:00:00 GMT
    From: Urban Fredriksson
    Subject: FAQ CONSTRUCTION TECHNIQUES, 14/14: Soldering, resistance
    SOLDERING, RESISTANCE
    Any recommendations for a resistance soldering unit?
            Go to your local friendly electronics supply house and buy a
            transformer with 110v primary, 6.2v (? or there about) secondary and a
            4 to 6 amp output on the secondary.

            Go to your local Radio Shack and get an insulated box big enough to
            hold the transformer.

            Wire a 110v plug to the primary of the transformer. (Do I need to
            remind you to use a grounding plug and take care not to electrocute
            yourself???)

            Run the secondary to two wires, one with something like an alligator
            clip, and the other to a clamp making a good connection to a  carbon
            rod.

            Where do you get a carbon rod? one might ask. Go somewhere where you
            can wash some chemicals away, and cut up an old flashlight battery or
            two. I have had good luck with both C cells and AA cells.  The center
            contains a carbon rod. Make a point on the rod with some sandpaper, or
            a pencil sharpener, or something, and clamp the second wire from the
            transformer's secondary to it. Radio Shack will have conenctors that
            will do the job.

            Now, when you plug in the transformer to the wall, and you connect the
            alligator clip to something metal connected to what you want to
            solder, and touch the sharp tip of the carbon rod to where you want to
            solder, the metal right around the tip of the carbon rod gets REALLY
            hot. Sounds kind of like one of those $250 dollar units to me. If you
            really make it fancy, you might spend $25 or $30 building the thing.

            How to make it fancy??

            First, I like to put a control on the 110v side of the transformer.  A
            normal light dimmer works well, although I have also had good luck
            with a sewing-machine foot control. These do not really have the
            current rating, but are ok for light duty work. I like having both
            hands to set up the work (the rod holds stuff in place) and then Zap
            with the foot.

            Second, I use large stereo-type plugs to connect to the secondary side
            with the clips and rods. This lets me have several different rod-size
            and clip configurations that are easy to switch.

            Third, Fancy handles for the carbon rods...

            Fourth, whatever else comes to mind. For the price, and ease of
            construction, you can afford to experiment.

    ------------------------------
    good luck
    wunder
    In article <3c7uucINNsp7@duncan.cs.utk.edu>, Vance Bass wrote:
    >    I have heard that it is possible to build a resistance soldering rig
    >using, among other things, an automobile battery charger and carbon rods from
    >flashlight batteries.
    >
    >    Has anyone ever done this?  Do you have or know of plans which detail
    >how to accomplish this?  (I have more money than time, but the amount which
    >is allocated to my hobby prevents me from spending $300 on a resistance
    >solderer.)
    >
    Its not possible. The transformer has to be a special type with a high
    current output secondaries. These things are expensive, hence the price
    of the comercial units. There are safety considerations.
    The units in the UK sell for about #100 ie $150 so you should be able to
    shop around for a better deal.
    ----------------------------------------------------------------------
    --
    Bill Bedford                                   Designer of Photo-Etches
    +44 9505 327

             Living on a island gives the world a different perspective
    ----------------------------------------------------------------------
    --
    In article <3c7uucINNsp7@duncan.cs.utk.edu>, Vance Bass writes:
    >    I have heard that it is possible to build a resistance soldering rig
    >using, among other things, an automobile battery charger and carbon rods from
    >flashlight batteries.

     I helped a friend build one for use in model car construction. The
    system that we used is very robust and I would much rather have it
    than a lamp-dimmer based unit.
     The components are:
     1 VARIAC variable auto-transformer, a small one is OK.
     A hefty 120V pri / 24V sec transformer
     AC voltmeter (across secondary of 24V xformer)
     ON/OFF foot switch (wired into primary of VARIAC)
     Carbon rods available from welding supply for carbon arc torch.
     All the electrical parts were obtained from various surplus houses
    (cheap). We put a fuse in the secondary of the 24V xformer for the
    rated output current of the transformer. I am told that the thing
    works very nicely!
                   -BK

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